Displaying results 1 to 5 of 21.

  1. Response by Bachleitner to "Translation and the materialities of communication"
    Published: 09.10.2015

    In her article, Karin Littau proposes a material or medial turn in the humanities and social sciences to end the neglect of the material basis to every act of communication, including translation. This proposal is warmly welcomed. As a comparatist... more

     

    In her article, Karin Littau proposes a material or medial turn in the humanities and social sciences to end the neglect of the material basis to every act of communication, including translation. This proposal is warmly welcomed. As a comparatist who has for some time been trying to build bridges between literary studies and book history, I strongly support Littau's point of view – all the more since I am less optimistic regarding the general acceptance of such ideas in the humanities, and especially in literary and translation studies. I am not so sure that McLuhan and the other authorities for the importance of mediality and technicity whom Littau quotes (e.g. Kittler, Ong, and Gumbrecht) have really provoked a "crisis in the self-understanding of the human sciences". For brevity's sake, in my response below, I leave aside literary studies to focus on translation studies.

     

    Content notes: free
    Source: CompaRe
    Language: English
    Media type: Article
    Format: Online
    DDC Categories: 800
    Rights: Veröffentlichungsvertrag für Publikationen
  2. Reading a suspenseful literary text activates brain areas related to social cognition and predictive inference

    Stories can elicit powerful emotions. A key emotional response to narrative plots (e.g., novels, movies, etc.) is suspense. Suspense appears to build on basic aspects of human cognition such as processes of expectation, anticipation, and prediction.... more

     

    Stories can elicit powerful emotions. A key emotional response to narrative plots (e.g., novels, movies, etc.) is suspense. Suspense appears to build on basic aspects of human cognition such as processes of expectation, anticipation, and prediction. However, the neural processes underlying emotional experiences of suspense have not been previously investigated. We acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data while participants read a suspenseful literary text (E.T.A. Hoffmann's "The Sandman") subdivided into short text passages. Individual ratings of experienced suspense obtained after each text passage were found to be related to activation in the medial frontal cortex, bilateral frontal regions (along the inferior frontal sulcus), lateral premotor cortex, as well as posterior temporal and temporo-parietal areas. The results indicate that the emotional experience of suspense depends on brain areas associated with social cognition and predictive inference.

     

    Content notes: free
    Source: CompaRe
    Language: English
    Media type: Article
    Format: Online
    DDC Categories: 800
    : Max-Planck-Institut für empirische Ästhetik
    Rights: Creative Commons - Namensnennung 4.0
  3. Towards a psychological construct of being moved

    The emotional state of being moved, though frequently referred to in both classical rhetoric and current language use, is far from established as a well-defined psychological construct. In a series of three studies, we investigated eliciting... more

     

    The emotional state of being moved, though frequently referred to in both classical rhetoric and current language use, is far from established as a well-defined psychological construct. In a series of three studies, we investigated eliciting scenarios, emotional ingredients, appraisal patterns, feeling qualities, and the affective signature of being moved and related emotional states. The great majority of the eliciting scenarios can be assigned to significant relationship and critical life events (especially death, birth, marriage, separation, and reunion). Sadness and joy turned out to be the two preeminent emotions involved in episodes of being moved. Both the sad and the joyful variants of being moved showed a coactivation of positive and negative affect and can thus be ranked among the mixed emotions. Moreover, being moved, while featuring only low-to-mid arousal levels, was experienced as an emotional state of high intensity; this applied to responses to fictional artworks no less than to own-life and other real, but media-represented, events. The most distinctive findings regarding cognitive appraisal dimensions were very low ratings for causation of the event by oneself and for having the power to change its outcome, along with very high ratings for appraisals of compatibility with social norms and self-ideals. Putting together the characteristics identified and discussed throughout the three studies, the paper ends with a sketch of a psychological construct of being moved.

     

    Content notes: free
    Source: CompaRe
    Language: English
    Media type: Article
    Format: Online
    DDC Categories: 800
    : Max-Planck-Institut für empirische Ästhetik
    Rights: Creative Commons - Namensnennung 4.0
  4. Indiologia brasileira : literatura, fotografia e alteridade cultural na obra do austríaco Mario Baldi Brazilian Indiology: literature, photography and cultural otherness in the work of the Austrian Mario Baldi
    Published: 01.12.2015

    O artigo aborda as experiências fotografias e narrativas do fotojornalista austríaco Mario Baldi, que trabalhou entre os índios brasileiros na primeira metade do século XX. Baldi escreveu um livro sobre sua convivência com os Carajá e publicou tanto... more

     

    O artigo aborda as experiências fotografias e narrativas do fotojornalista austríaco Mario Baldi, que trabalhou entre os índios brasileiros na primeira metade do século XX. Baldi escreveu um livro sobre sua convivência com os Carajá e publicou tanto no Brasil quanto na Alemanha. O objetivo dessa análise é comparar as duas versões e abordar as inovações e limites das representações que Baldi faz da alteridade cultural brasileira, influenciadas por um romantismo etnológico compartilhado por alguns estudiosos brasileiros e alemães, denominado nos anos 1940 e 1950 de indiologia brasileira. This article concerns photographic and narrative experiences of the Austrian photographer Mario Baldi, who worked among Brazilian Indians in the first half of the twentieth century. Baldi wrote a book about his relation with the Carajá and published it both in Brazil and Germany. This analysis aims to compare both versions of the book and consider the innovations and limits of the representations made by Baldi about the cultural otherness in Brazil. These representations, shared by both Brazilian and German authors, were influenced by an ethnological romantism, the so-called Brazilian Indiology in the 1940's and 1950's.

     

    Content notes: free
    Source: CompaRe
    Language: Portuguese
    Media type: Article
    Format: Online
    DDC Categories: 300; 830
    Rights: Creative Commons - Namensnennung-Nicht kommerziell 3.0
  5. Between canon and corpus: six perspectives on 20th-century novels
    Published: 01.01.2015

    Of the many, many thousands of novels and stories published in English in the 20th century, which group of several hundred would represent the most reasonable, interesting, and useful subset of the whole? more

     

    Of the many, many thousands of novels and stories published in English in the 20th century, which group of several hundred would represent the most reasonable, interesting, and useful subset of the whole?

     

    Content notes: free
    Source: CompaRe
    Language: English
    Media type: Working paper
    Format: Online
    DDC Categories: 800
    : Stanford Literary Lab
    Rights: Veröffentlichungsvertrag für Publikationen