CompaRe durchsuchen

Recherchieren Sie hier in allen Dokumenten, die auf CompaRe publiziert wurden.

Filtern nach
Letzte Suchanfragen

Ergebnisse für *

Zeige Ergebnisse 1 bis 5 von 115.

  1. Quantitative formalism: an experiment

    This paper is the report of a study conducted by five people – four at Stanford, and one at the University of Wisconsin – which tried to establish whether computer-generated algorithms could "recognize" literary genres. You take 'David Copperfield',... mehr

     

    This paper is the report of a study conducted by five people – four at Stanford, and one at the University of Wisconsin – which tried to establish whether computer-generated algorithms could "recognize" literary genres. You take 'David Copperfield', run it through a program without any human input – "unsupervised", as the expression goes – and ... can the program figure out whether it's a gothic novel or a 'Bildungsroman'? The answer is, fundamentally, Yes: but a Yes with so many complications that it is necessary to look at the entire process of our study. These are new methods we are using, and with new methods the process is almost as important as the results.

     

    Hinweise zum Inhalt: kostenfrei
    Quelle: CompaRe
    Sprache: Englisch
    Medientyp: Arbeitspapier
    Format: Online
    DDC Klassifikation: Literatur und Rhetorik (800); Literaturtheorie (801)
    Sammlung: Stanford Literary Lab
    Lizenz: Veröffentlichungsvertrag für Publikationen
  2. Network theory, plot analysis
    Erschienen: 01.05.2011

    In the last few years, literary studies have experienced what we could call the rise of quantitative evidence. This had happened before of course, without producing lasting effects, but this time it’s probably going to be different, because this time... mehr

     

    In the last few years, literary studies have experienced what we could call the rise of quantitative evidence. This had happened before of course, without producing lasting effects, but this time it’s probably going to be different, because this time we have digital databases, and automated data retrieval. As Michel’s and Lieberman’s recent article on "Culturomics" made clear, the width of the corpus and the speed of the search have increased beyond all expectations: today, we can replicate in a few minutes investigations that took a giant like Leo Spitzer months and years of work. When it comes to phenomena of language and style, we can do things that previous generations could only dream of.

    When it comes to language and style. But if you work on novels or plays, style is only part of the picture. What about plot – how can that be quantified? This paper is the beginning of an answer, and the beginning of the beginning is network theory. This is a theory that studies connections within large groups of objects: the objects can be just about anything – banks, neurons, film actors, research papers, friends... – and are usually called nodes or vertices; their connections are usually called edges; and the analysis of how vertices are linked by edges has revealed many unexpected features of large systems, the most famous one being the so-called "small-world" property, or "six degrees of separation": the uncanny rapidity with which one can reach any vertex in the network from any other vertex. The theory proper requires a level of mathematical intelligence which I unfortunately lack; and it typically uses vast quantities of data which will also be missing from my paper. But this is only the first in a series of studies we’re doing at the Stanford Literary Lab; and then, even at this early stage, a few things emerge.

     

    Hinweise zum Inhalt: kostenfrei
    Quelle: CompaRe
    Sprache: Englisch
    Medientyp: Arbeitspapier
    Format: Online
    DDC Klassifikation: Literatur und Rhetorik (800)
    Sammlung: Stanford Literary Lab
    Lizenz: Veröffentlichungsvertrag für Publikationen
  3. Becoming Yourself : The Afterlife of Reception
    Autor: Finn, Ed
    Erschienen: 15.09.2011

    If there is one thing to be learned from David Foster Wallace, it is that cultural transmission is a tricky game. This was a problem Wallace confronted as a literary professional, a university-based writer during what Mark McGurl has called the... mehr

     

    If there is one thing to be learned from David Foster Wallace, it is that cultural transmission is a tricky game. This was a problem Wallace confronted as a literary professional, a university-based writer during what Mark McGurl has called the Program Era. But it was also a philosophical issue he grappled with on a deep level as he struggled to combat his own loneliness through writing. This fundamental concern with literature as a social, collaborative enterprise has also gained some popularity among scholars of contemporary American literature, particularly McGurl and James English: both critics explore the rules by which prestige or cultural distinction is awarded to authors (English; McGurl). Their approach requires a certain amount of empirical work, since these claims move beyond the individual experience of the text into forms of collective reading and cultural exchange influenced by social class, geographical location, education, ethnicity, and other factors. Yet McGurl and English's groundbreaking work is limited by the very forms of exclusivity they analyze: the protective bubble of creative writing programs in the academy and the elite economy of prestige surrounding literary prizes, respectively. To really study the problem of cultural transmission, we need to look beyond the symbolic markets of prestige to the real market, the site of mass literary consumption, where authors succeed or fail based on their ability to speak to that most diverse and complicated of readerships: the general public. Unless we study what I call the social lives of books, we make the mistake of keeping literature in the same ascetic laboratory that Wallace tried to break out of with his intense authorial focus on popular culture, mass media, and everyday life.

     

    Hinweise zum Inhalt: kostenfrei
    Quelle: CompaRe
    Sprache: Englisch
    Medientyp: Arbeitspapier
    Format: Online
    DDC Klassifikation: Literatur und Rhetorik (800)
    Sammlung: Stanford Literary Lab
    Lizenz: Veröffentlichungsvertrag für Publikationen
  4. Architextur
    Erschienen: 25.05.2011

    Der Wechsel vom mechanischen zum elektronischen Paradigma, von der klassischen zur modernen episteme bedeutet, so geht aus der hier angestellten Untersuchung hervor, eine große Herausforderung für die Architektur. Solange sich das mechanische... mehr

     

    Der Wechsel vom mechanischen zum elektronischen Paradigma, von der klassischen zur modernen episteme bedeutet, so geht aus der hier angestellten Untersuchung hervor, eine große Herausforderung für die Architektur. Solange sich das mechanische Paradigma, die klassischen episteme sich selbst als Architektur erkennen konnten, kann das non-fundamentalistische Paradigma seine Identität in der Art von Architektur nicht mehr finden. (Oder: sie erfindet keine mehr dafür.) Im mechanischen Paradigma konnte man, was wirklich ist und was Wirklichkeit ist am Haus, an dessen fest fundierter, zur harmonischen Einheit gefügter hierarchischer Ordnung zum Zweck der Umschließung ablesen. Das Gebäude konnte auch für das Denkgebäude der episteme ohne weiteres zum Vorbild und Leitbild werden. Die Art von Architektur besitzt aber kaum mehr Gültigkeit für ein Weltbild, das aus Zufallsmomenten und Entgleitungen, aus unregelhafter Mehrdimensionalität, Simultaneität und Virtualität besteht. Um die entgleitende Position des Identitätsstifters einigermaßen restaurieren zu können, sollte die Architektur ihre Konventionen der Formgestaltung, ihre Konventionen der Theoriebildung, ja ihre ganze Architeturidentität ändern. Die ver-störenden Gesten der Grenzverschiebungen in Philosophie und Architektur des Dekonstruktivismus optieren vielleicht dafür.

     

    Hinweise zum Inhalt: kostenfrei
    Quelle: CompaRe
    Sprache: Deutsch
    Medientyp: Wissenschaftlicher Artikel
    Format: Online
    DDC Klassifikation: Literatur und Rhetorik (800)
    Lizenz: Veröffentlichungsvertrag für Publikationen
  5. Paratext und Text als Übergangszone
    Autor: Wirth, Uwe
    Erschienen: 24.05.2011

    Die Reflexion der Grenze zwischen Text und Nicht-Text findet zumeist ‚am Rahmen’, nämlich im Paratext, statt. Insbesondere die „Vorredenreflexion“ […] will bei den Lesern das „Fiktivitätsbewußtsein“ […] für den nachfolgenden Text wecken. Ich möchte... mehr

     

    Die Reflexion der Grenze zwischen Text und Nicht-Text findet zumeist ‚am Rahmen’, nämlich im Paratext, statt. Insbesondere die „Vorredenreflexion“ […] will bei den Lesern das „Fiktivitätsbewußtsein“ […] für den nachfolgenden Text wecken. Ich möchte im Folgenden der Frage nachgehen, wie dieses Grenzbewusstsein entsteht. Dabei gehe ich von der Prämisse aus, dass Paratexte – vor allem Vorworte – einen Zugang zum Haupttext eröffnen, indem sie sich selbst als Übergangszone in Szene setzen: als Übergangszone, in der die Grenzen zwischen all dem, was fiktiver Text ist und all dem, was nicht fiktiver Text ist, verhandelt werden. Die Rede vom Paratext als Übergangszone impliziert neben dem Gesichtspunkt der Räumlichkeit auch eine Form der Bewegung, durch die diese Übergangszone überhaupt erst konstituiert wird. Es handelt sich […] um eine „Praktik im Raum“ […] durch die der Leser – die Leserin – den Weg aus der realen Lebenswelt in die fiktionale Welt des Textes finden soll. Dieses paratextuelle travelling möchte ich im Rekurs auf Jean Paul beschreiben – ein Schriftsteller, der wie kein anderer eine Vielzahl spielerischer Praktiken im paratextuellen Raum entwickelt hat. Mitunter hat man sogar den Eindruck, dass Jean Paul mehr Wert auf seine Paratexte als auf seine Texte legt. Zugleich, und dies scheint mir für das Thema Raum und Bewegung in der Literatur interessant zu sein, fällt auf, dass Jean Paul im Rahmen seiner Paratexte ostentativ Raummetaphern bemüht.

     

    Hinweise zum Inhalt: kostenfrei
    Quelle: CompaRe
    Sprache: Deutsch
    Medientyp: Teil eines Buches (Kapitel)
    Format: Online
    ISBN: 978-3-8376-1136-6
    DDC Klassifikation: Literatur und Rhetorik (800)
    Lizenz: Veröffentlichungsvertrag für Publikationen